Growing Horseradish a
Great Condiment

Growing horseradish plants require a long growing season and a climate that freezes in the winter.

Spice up your garden with this hardy perennial that grows as far north as zone 3.

I love horseradish sauce, the first time I saw horse radish growing in the garden was at my parent’s home.

My father planted it on the side of their yard and my mother let me take a piece of the root. I brought the root home and planted it in my front flower bed. I was amazed how quickly the horseradish grew.

Horseradish has a long tap root that can go 5 to 10 feet deep so it can be very tenacious if the growing conditions are right. Horseradish needs long summers for good vegetative growth and freezing winters to give the roots a dormant period.

Horseradish vegetation grows 2 to 3 feet in height and sends out flower stems with small white flowers in the summer. It produces very little seed and the seed it dose produce has a short shelf life.

Because of the non viable seeds horseradish is propagated by root cuttings. If you have a friend with a horseradish plant you can take a piece of root from them. Barring that you can buy a plant from your local nursery.

Horseradish has beautiful vegetation and is a real nice addition to your flower beds. I love that it grows back each year. Digging up roots each fall can keep the horseradish plant in check. The extra roots can be used to make horseradish sauce.

Growing Horseradish

Choose a sunny spot in the garden that horseradish can grow undisturbed over the years. Horseradish can take some shade and tolerates most soils as long as isn’t soggy. Horseradish can be planted in the spring or fall.

Horseradish likes moist well drained fertile soil for good root development. Dig a hole around 12 inches deep and fill with compost.

Place a piece of horseradish root about 6 inches long into the hole at an angle with the top of the root 2 inches from the surface of the soil. Carefully fill in with soil so as not to disturb the root placement.

Water plants once a week during dry periods. Use mulch around the horseradish plants to keep the weeds down and soil moist.

Once the plants are established horseradish doesn’t need much tending. Enjoy the beautiful foliage and contrast it adds to your garden.

Harvesting Horseradish

The main vegetation growth is during the summer. The roots do not begin to thicken until the weather cools in the fall.

Harvest roots after the first frost when the top begins to die back. Harvesting can be done until the ground freezes.


Remove the dirt around the base of the horseradish plant. Loosen the soil around the side roots and carefully cut them off.

To keep the plant small you can heavily harvest the roots or dig the whole plant up and replant small cuttings for next years growth.

Cut the harvested roots into manageable sizes and scrub the dirt off with a soft brush. Store the fresh roots in a plastic bag in your refrigerator.

Horseradish roots can be made into horseradish sauce or grated into vegetables and meat dishes.



Cut the harvested roots into manageable sizes and scrub the dirt off with a soft brush. Store the fresh roots in a plastic bag in your refrigerator.

Horseradish roots can be made into horseradish sauce or grated into vegetables and meat dishes.




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